Go back even farther...

1760

In 1775, the population reaches 700

1800

At the end of 1824, the Missouri General Assembly passed a law for enslaved persons to sue for freedom and have some protections in the process.

 In early 1764, after France lost the Seven Years' War, Pierre Laclède and his stepson Auguste Chouteau founded what was to become the city of St. Louis.

 

They bring the institution of slavery along, as well.

1780

1820

1834 - The Missouri Supreme Court ends Indian slavery

1833 - Germans are immigrating to St. Louis.

In December, 500 German immigrants arrive in a single day

1854 - On August 7, election day in St. Louis, a nativist mob kills 10 , wounds 33, and  destroys 93 Irish dwellings & buildings

1840

1861 to 1865 - The Civil War leaves one million dead.

St. Louis was a strategic location for the Union army and navy.

In 1864, an integrated group of St. Louisans established schools without public finances for more than 1,500 black pupils.

By 1850, due to the growing immigrant population and available labor, slavery becomes so unprofitable slaves begin selling their labor and some are able to sue or purchase their freedom

In 1847, an enslaved St. Louisan named Dred Scott filed suit for freedom jump starting the Civil War.  St. Louis has over 80,000 residents, including 2,656 slaves & 1,398 free persons of color.

Also in 1847, education of blacks and mulattoes is banned. Anyone caught teaching a black or mulatto person, whether enslaved or free, is fined and jailed.

In 1860, the population reached 160,000 consisting mostly of recent immigrants who were Catholic German and Irish Americans.

1860

January 11, 1865, slavery is abolished in Missouri

1880

1879 - Exodusters arrive from South via Underground Railroad

1904 - The World Fair is hosted

1900

1920

1939 - WWII begins, St. Louis produces ammunition and soldiers for the effort

1940

1954 - Pruitt–Igoe is built to house the large urban population

1945 - WWII Ends, soldiers return, war factories close

           Baby Boom

1960

2000

1972-1976 - Pruitt–Igoe is demolished

1980

2015 - In response to the police shooting and subsequent unrest in Ferguson, the U.S. Department of Justice investigates policing practices in St. Louis.

The best is yet to come....

 

Go back even farther...

1760

In 1775, the population reaches 700

 In early 1764, after France lost the Seven Years' War, Pierre Laclède and his stepson Auguste Chouteau founded what was to become the city of St. Louis.

 

They bring the institution of slavery along, as well.

1780

1800

At the end of 1824, the Missouri General Assembly passed a law for enslaved persons to sue for freedom and have some protections in the process.

1820

1834 - The Missouri Supreme Court ends Indian slavery

1833 - Germans are immigrating to St. Louis.

In December, 500 German immigrants arrive in a single day

1854 - On August 7, election day in St. Louis, a nativist mob kills 10 , wounds 33, and  destroys 93 Irish dwellings & buildings

1840

1861 to 1865 - The Civil War leaves one million dead.

St. Louis was a strategic location for the Union army and navy.

In 1864, an integrated group of St. Louisans established schools without public finances for more than 1,500 black pupils.

In 1847, an enslaved St. Louisan named Dred Scott filed suit for freedom jump starting the Civil War.  St. Louis has over 80,000 residents, including 2,656 slaves & 1,398 free persons of color.

Also in 1847, education of blacks and mulattoes is banned. Anyone caught teaching a black or mulatto person, whether enslaved or free, is fined and jailed.

By 1850, due to the growing immigrant population and available labor, slavery becomes so unprofitable slaves begin selling their labor and some are able to sue or purchase their freedom

In 1860, the population reached 160,000 consisting mostly of recent immigrants who were Catholic German and Irish Americans.

1860

January 11, 1865, slavery is abolished in Missouri

1880

1879 - Exodusters arrive from South via Underground Railroad

1920

1904 - The World Fair is hosted

1900

1939 - WWII begins, St. Louis produces ammunition and soldiers for the effort

1940

1954 - Pruitt–Igoe is built to house the large urban population

1945 - WWII Ends, soldiers return, war factories close

           Baby Boom

1960

2000

1972-1976 - Pruitt–Igoe is demolished

1980

2015 - In response to the police shooting and subsequent unrest in Ferguson, the U.S. Department of Justice investigates policing practices in St. Louis.

The best is yet to come....

1820 - Members of the Erin Benevolent Society organized the

            first public observance of St. Patrick's Day in St. Louis.


            One-seventh of the city’s 700 men were Irish.

IRISH in ST. LOUIS

1840 to 1845 - As potato blights and  famines cause starvation, disease and death in Ireland, Irish come to America and begin settling in St. Louis. 

1854 - On August 7th, election day in St. Louis, "nativist" attack the Irish. 10 are killed and 30 wounded, and 93 Irish dwellings & buildings were destoyed.

1867 - John Mullanphy opens the The Mullanphy Emigrant Home on the southern end of the burgeoning Old North St. Louis neighborhood at 1609 N. 14th Street. 

1877 - Southern Hotel, owned by Irish fur trader, Robert Campbell, burns down killing 21 guests and workers. Irish Fireman Phelim O'Toole becomes a hero. 

Early 1900's - when the clay mines opened, many of the Irish left the Patch to settle in Cheltenham

1845
1855
1865
1875
1885
1840
1850

In 1850, 43% of St. Louisans are German or Irish.

By 1851, when the U.S. census recorded a St. Louis population of 70,000, approximately 14% of those people were born in Ireland.

1860

1861 - St. Louis leads the United States in highest population of non-Americans. 29,000 of 160,773 hail from Ireland!

1870
1880
1890

By 1870 - The Civil War ends with 150,000 Irish Americans fighting for the Union.

Still facing poverty and disease, Irish continue to arrive in America and reunite with relatives.

1879 - Exodusters seek refuge in St. Louis and other cities. The competition

for available jobs in the area becomes tense.

Clay mining and brick making was the root of growth and stability from 1860 to 1900.

 

There is so much to be done.

It  will take a village.

Most people looking down a particular alley in south St. Louis are struck by a notion that doesn’t often strike: That is one cool alley.

The reason the alley is so striking — an especially wide thoroughfare with a tree-lined boulevard in the middle — is because it used to be a railroad right-of-way, home to a stretch of track that hauled clay from area mines and delivered it to a brick works about two miles away.

The alley in question is near the intersection of Chippewa Street and Kingshighway Boulevard. All that remains now of the pathway is a one-block stretch south of Chippewa, running east-west from Macklind and Brannon avenues.

And all that remains of the train — a locomotive known as 

http://www.stltoday.com/lifestyles/columns/joe-holleman/spotlight-wide-alley-remains-as-last-sign-of-clay-mine/article_0decb922-1421-52d9-9f5c-7773266c5b5c.html

Go back even farther

 In early 1764, after France lost the Seven Years' War, Pierre Laclède and his stepson Auguste Chouteau founded what was to become the city of St. Louis. They bring the institution of slavery along, as well.

In 1775, the population reaches 700

1945 - WWII Ends, soldiers return, war factories close, Baby Boom

1939 - WWII begins, St. Louis produces ammunition and soldiers for the effort

In 1847, an enslaved St. Louisan named Dred Scott filed suit for freedom jump starting the Civil War.  St. Louis has over 80,000 residents, including 2,656 slaves & 1,398 free persons of color.

Also in 1847, education of blacks and mulattoes is banned. Anyone caught teaching a black or mulatto person, whether enslaved or free, is fined and jailed.

By 1850, due to the growing immigrant population and available labor, slavery becomes so unprofitable slaves begin selling their labor and some are able to sue or purchase their freedom

1854 - On August 7, election day in St. Louis, a nativist mob kills 10 , wounds 33, and  destroys 93 Irish dwellings & buildings

1760

1790

1910

1820

1880

1940

1970

2000

January 11, 1865, slavery is abolished in Missouri

1904 - The World Fair is hosted

1879 - Exodusters arrive

1850

1954 - Pruitt–Igoe is built to house the large urban population

At the end of 1824, the Missouri General Assembly passed a law for enslaved persons to sue for freedom and have some protections in the process.

1833 - Germans are immigrating to St. Louis. In December, 500 German immigrants arrive in a single day

1834 - The Missouri Supreme Court ends Indian slavery

In 1864, an integrated group of St. Louisans established schools without public finances for more than 1,500 black pupils.

1861 to 1865 - The Civil War leaves one million dead. St. Louis was a strategic location for the Union army and navy.

In 1860, the population reached 160,000 consisting mostly of recent immigrants who were Catholic German and Irish Americans.

1972-1976 - Pruitt–Igoe is demolished

2015 - In response to the police shooting and subsequent unrest in Ferguson, the U.S. Department of Justice investigates policing practices in St. Louis.

The best is yet to come....

Go back even farther

The best is yet to come....

 day 1 

1840

Go back even farther

 In early 1764, after France lost the Seven Years' War, Pierre Laclède and his stepson Auguste Chouteau founded what was to become the city of St. Louis. They bring the institution of slavery along, as well.

In 1847, an enslaved St. Louisan named Dred Scott filed suit for freedom jump starting the Civil War.  St. Louis has over 80,000 residents, including 2,656 slaves & 1,398 free persons of color.

Also in 1847, education of blacks and mulattoes is banned. Anyone caught teaching a black or mulatto person, whether enslaved or free, is fined and jailed.

By 1850, due to the growing immigrant population and available labor, slavery becomes so unprofitable slaves begin selling their labor and some are able to sue or purchase their freedom

In 1775, the population reaches 700

1854 - On August 7, election day in St. Louis, a nativist mob kills 10 , wounds 33, and  destroys 93 Irish dwellings & buildings

1939 - WWII begins, St. Louis produces ammunition and soldiers for the effort

1945 - WWII Ends, soldiers return, war factories close, Baby Boom

1760

1790

1910

1820

1880

1940

1970

2000

January 11, 1865, slavery is abolished in Missouri

1904 - The World Fair is hosted

1879 - Exodusters arrive

1850

1954 - Pruitt–Igoe is built to house the large urban population

At the end of 1824, the Missouri General Assembly passed a law for enslaved persons to sue for freedom and have some protections in the process.

1833 - Germans are immigrating to St. Louis. In December, 500 German immigrants arrive in a single day

1834 - The Missouri Supreme Court ends Indian slavery

In 1864, an integrated group of St. Louisans established schools without public finances for more than 1,500 black pupils.

1972-1976 - Pruitt–Igoe is demolished

1861 to 1865 - The Civil War leaves one million dead. St. Louis was a strategic location for the Union army and navy.

2015 - In response to the police shooting and subsequent unrest in Ferguson, the U.S. Department of Justice investigates policing practices in St. Louis.

The best is yet to come....

In 1860, the population reached 160,000 consisting mostly of recent immigrants who were Catholic German and Irish Americans.

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